Archive for Daniel Kuehn

Spillover Bias in Contiguous County Approach

Daniel Kuehn has a very interesting new paper on possible spillover bias when using a “contiguous county” approach in economic analysis. For example, this is the approach in the influential Dube et al. (2010) minimum wage paper, which Paul Krugman for example singled out as epitomizing the new research that overturned the old view about […]

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More Murphy Meandering (through) Minimum Wage Literature

At EconLib. Here’s something that might surprise you, but you need the background info that when Krugman told the NYT readers that there is “just no evidence” that minimum wage hikes reduce employment, he linked to a 2010 paper by Dube et al. So with that: If we are discussing proposals to increase the minimum […]

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A Helpful Mnemonic in the Minimum Wage Debate

I am working on a paper for the Fraser Institute on the minimum wage debate. Both Krugman and Daniel Kuehn stressed the importance of picking a “treatment” versus a “control” group, in order to see that the minimum wage really doesn’t have much impact on employment (at least for modest hikes). Of course the pioneering […]

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Hidden in Plain Sight?

The world’s most wanted whistleblower isn’t in Russia. That’s just what he wants you to think.

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Regression Pitfalls: Why Growth Rate versus Level Could Be Crucial

Daniel Kuehn and I have been reading a lot of the major papers in the minimum wage debate. (I had asked Daniel if he would be willing to work through these papers with me, since this is his area and [given our different political perspectives] I wanted to make sure I was being fair to […]

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I Was Less Than Clear on My Problem With Krugman’s Unemployment Insurance Post

[UPDATE below.] Productively using our time, Daniel Kuehn and I have been arguing at his blog about the recent unpleasantness which resulted in the war-crime of Krugman calling me (and Russ Roberts) “idiots.” (Krugman’s intentional strikethrough raises it from a petty insult into a cool elbow-throw.) So here’s the progression: (1) Russ Roberts complained that […]

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Someone Has to Remind Bryan Caplan That No Such Thing as Utils

One of the issues in Bryan Caplan’s famous “Why I’m Not An Austrian Economist” essay (even though he had been one when he was younger) is the issue of cardinal utility functions. A lot of Rothbardians like to roll their eyes at the mainstream for thinking utility is a cardinal entity that can be measured […]

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Fellow Rothbardians: The Jig Is Up

I told you guys not to push it, or else our whole plan would blow up in our faces. Now seriously, who went and typed in two sentences on the Wikipedia entry for “liquidity preference,” explaining that Murray Rothbard disagrees that it is the proper way to explain interest? Who was it? It’s better if […]

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